Dr. J. Marion Sims Monument. Central Park. Dr. Sims was a surgeon and regarded as the father of modern gynecology. He is often credited for giving the field a separate medical specialty. He founded the first hospital for women in America in New York City in 1855. In recent years he has become a controversial figure for his use of slaves as experimental subjects. The statue was dedicated in 1894 and originally placed in Bryant Park (Hell’s Kitchen). It was brought to it’s current site on the Upper East Side in 1934 across from the Academy of Medicine, which Dr. Sims was a member of.

Dr. J. Marion Sims Monument. Central Park. Dr. Sims was a surgeon and regarded as the father of modern gynecology. He is often credited for giving the field a separate medical specialty. He founded the first hospital for women in America in New York City in 1855. In recent years he has become a controversial figure for his use of slaves as experimental subjects. The statue was dedicated in 1894 and originally placed in Bryant Park (Hell’s Kitchen). It was brought to it’s current site on the Upper East Side in 1934 across from the Academy of Medicine, which Dr. Sims was a member of.

The Frances Hodgeson Burnett Memorial Fountain video. The English Formal Garden. The Conservatory Garden. Central Park.

The English Formal Garden. Conservatory Garden. Central Park. The southern most garden in the Conservatory Garden is the English Garden. Trees, shrubs and flowers that change all year long make this my favorite. While formal, this garden just seemed a little more relaxed than the French and Italian Gardens. The trees offer shade and the sound of the fountain make you want to sit and take in the sights and sounds, or perhaps a good book. Speaking of the fountain, it was designed by sculpture Bessie Potter Vonnoh’s. The Frances Hodgeson Burnett Memorial Fountain is a tribute to the children’s book The Secret Garden. The boy and girl depict Dickon and Mary the main characters from the classic. The fountain stands at the end of a pretty lily pond.

The Three Dancing Maidens. Conservatory Gardens. Central Park.

The French Formal Garden. Conservatory Garden. Central Park. This is the most northern garden in the Conservatory Garden. Like the other three styles, this garden is formal. The French garden showcases precision-trimmed hedges of Japanese holly along with a spectacular display of spring tulips (in the autumn they are Korean chrysanthemums). As you pass through arbors and step down to the center of the garden there is a beautiful fountain of Three Dancing Maidens by German (not French) sculpture Walter Schott.

The Italian Style Formal Garden. Conservatory Garden. Central Park. This is the center of the three gardens which make up the Conservatory Garden and it is entered through the Vanderbuilt Gate. It’s composed of a large lawn surrounded by yew hedges and bordered by two spring-blooming pink and white crabapple trees. At the opposite end of the lawn is a 12 foot high jet fountain (unfortunatley turned off during my visit). Tiered hedges lead up to the wisteria pergola. The walkway under the pergola has 13 medallions inscribed with the names of the original 13 states, (hmmm…not very Italian). Very formal.

Vanderbuilt Gate. Central Park. This is the entrance to Central Park’s Conservatory Garden located in the park’s north-eastern area along 5th Avenue. The gate is considered to be one of the finest examples of wrought-iron work in Manhattan. The gate was built in France and shipped to the city for the mansion of Cornelius Vanderbuilt II located at 5th Avenue and 58th Street. Later, Gertrude Vanderbuilt Whitney, founder of the Whitney Museum of American Art, gifted the gate to the City.
The gate is used as a back-drop to countless wedding photographs.

Vanderbuilt Gate. Central Park. This is the entrance to Central Park’s Conservatory Garden located in the park’s north-eastern area along 5th Avenue. The gate is considered to be one of the finest examples of wrought-iron work in Manhattan. The gate was built in France and shipped to the city for the mansion of Cornelius Vanderbuilt II located at 5th Avenue and 58th Street. Later, Gertrude Vanderbuilt Whitney, founder of the Whitney Museum of American Art, gifted the gate to the City.

The gate is used as a back-drop to countless wedding photographs.