White Horse Tavern. West Village. This place has a rich history. The bar opened in 1880 to a clientele that was mostly longshoremen. In the 1950’s and ‘60’s it became  known for it’s bohemian culture, a gathering place for writers and artists. Some of it’s regulars included: Dylan Thomas, Bob Dylan, Norman Mailer, Jim Morrison and others. 
The song ‘Those Were The Days’ which was song by Mary Hopkin in 1972, has the opening line ‘Once upon a time there was a tavern’. The tavern would be White Horse.

White Horse Tavern. West Village. This place has a rich history. The bar opened in 1880 to a clientele that was mostly longshoremen. In the 1950’s and ‘60’s it becameĀ  known for it’s bohemian culture, a gathering place for writers and artists. Some of it’s regulars included: Dylan Thomas, Bob Dylan, Norman Mailer, Jim Morrison and others.

The song ‘Those Were The Days’ which was song by Mary Hopkin in 1972, has the opening line ‘Once upon a time there was a tavern’. The tavern would be White Horse.

Cobblestone Streets. Meat Packing District. Somewhere in time, after dirt roads and before asphalt and concrete, NYC streets were lined with cobblestones. They allowed roads to be heavily used all year long and prevented ‘dips’ and mud associated with dirt roads. The roads are noisey as well. The noise was an advantage in the days of carrages and horse hooves because pedestrians could hear up-coming traffic. When someone had a baby or became sick, straw would be thrown down in front of the home to reduce the noise. These days they are even noisier with automobiles.
Many of the cobblestone streets in Manhattan have been covered over with some type of pavement. Many times when road repairs are necessary, the old cobblestone street is revealed underneath. Today cobblestone streets are left intact for historical reasons, a fact not taken lightly by women in high-heels.
Note: The overpass in the back-ground is part of The Highline, Manhattans newest and very popular park.

Cobblestone Streets. Meat Packing District. Somewhere in time, after dirt roads and before asphalt and concrete, NYC streets were lined with cobblestones. They allowed roads to be heavily used all year long and prevented ‘dips’ and mud associated with dirt roads. The roads are noisey as well. The noise was an advantage in the days of carrages and horse hooves because pedestrians could hear up-coming traffic. When someone had a baby or became sick, straw would be thrown down in front of the home to reduce the noise. These days they are even noisier with automobiles.

Many of the cobblestone streets in Manhattan have been covered over with some type of pavement. Many times when road repairs are necessary, the old cobblestone street is revealed underneath. Today cobblestone streets are left intact for historical reasons, a fact not taken lightly by women in high-heels.

Note: The overpass in the back-ground is part of The Highline, Manhattans newest and very popular park.