The Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum. Hell’s Kitchen. One of the current exhibits at the museum is called ‘Camouflage’. It shows the history (and art) of camouflage and it’s use in the military. This particular display has a life-sized, camouflaged solder (mannequin), in a 3’x3’x6’ cube. As you walk around the cube you eventually notice the solder. The point is, if you weren’t told he or she was there, you probably never would have known.

The Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum. Hell’s Kitchen. One of the current exhibits at the museum is called ‘Camouflage’. It shows the history (and art) of camouflage and it’s use in the military. This particular display has a life-sized, camouflaged solder (mannequin), in a 3’x3’x6’ cube. As you walk around the cube you eventually notice the solder. The point is, if you weren’t told he or she was there, you probably never would have known.

Mercury Space Capsule. The Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum. Hell’s Kitchen. The Mercury program was the first human spaceflight program of the United States. The program ran from 1959 through 1963. The goal of the program was to put a human in orbit around the Earth. The Soviet Union beat us by a month in 1961 by putting Yuri Gagarin into Earth’s orbit before American Alan Shepard. We of course had bigger plans and were first to land on the moon eight years later with the Apollo space program.

This capsule is a replica. The Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum makes it very clear when something is genuine and something is a replica. While a replica would be unacceptable in an art museum, I can understand a history or science museum using them as long as they are upfront about it.

That being said, I also want to be upfront. I used two twenty dollar bills to get into the museum today…one was a replica.

The Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum. The hangar deck. Hell’s Kitchen. The Intrepid had a crew of 3000. Some worked on the flight deck and the deck’s ‘island’ but most worked below deck. When the temperature below deck would rise, many of the crew would get in front of this huge fan, flick a switch and cool off. This practice was stopped however due to the number of men blown out to sea through the emergency doors (see bottom photo).

If you believe this, I have a bridge on the lower east side connecting Manhattan to Brooklyn for sale… The above is actually one of the four Intrepid’s screws (propellers). These screws would move massive amounts of water in order to propel the ship through the seas.

By the way, speaking of the Brooklyn Bridge, keep following my blog as I eventually visit all of the bridges connecting Manhattan to the rest of the world.

Inside the Hangar Deck. The Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum. Hell’s Kitchen. The hangar deck is massive (think shopping mall). It sits below the flight deck and served as a ‘garage’ for the Intrepid’s aircraft. These days, it serves as a comfortable place to check out endless exhibits away from the heat, cold, rain, snow, (you name it), on the flight deck. (No complaints the day I visited the museum, the weather was NYC perfect). As you walk the museum, it’s hard to believe that everything you see is in the hull of a huge ship on the Hudson.

Inside the Hangar Deck. The Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum. Hell’s Kitchen. The hangar deck is massive (think shopping mall). It sits below the flight deck and served as a ‘garage’ for the Intrepid’s aircraft. These days, it serves as a comfortable place to check out endless exhibits away from the heat, cold, rain, snow, (you name it), on the flight deck. (No complaints the day I visited the museum, the weather was NYC perfect). As you walk the museum, it’s hard to believe that everything you see is in the hull of a huge ship on the Hudson.

The Hangar Deck. The Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum. Hell’s Kitchen. Many people think the planes that are on the flight deck are the only ones on the carrier at that particular time. Actually most of the planes, jets and helicopters are stored on the carrier’s hangar deck. Once an aircraft has landed, or is about to take off, an elevator moves the craft to the appropriate deck (good thing those wings fold)! In the photo above you can see the elevator (it has a plane with a red tail) on the flight deck about to bring the craft down to the hangar deck.

The Hangar Deck. The Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum. Hell’s Kitchen. Many people think the planes that are on the flight deck are the only ones on the carrier at that particular time. Actually most of the planes, jets and helicopters are stored on the carrier’s hangar deck. Once an aircraft has landed, or is about to take off, an elevator moves the craft to the appropriate deck (good thing those wings fold)! In the photo above you can see the elevator (it has a plane with a red tail) on the flight deck about to bring the craft down to the hangar deck.

The Space Shuttle Pavilion. The Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum. Hell’s Kitchen. The Pavilion has lots of displays with information regarding not only the shuttle program but space exploration history as well. The above displays offer information about:

  1. The space shuttle Enterprise’s trip from JFK airport to it’s current location on the Intrepid.
  2. Years of intensive engineering behind the space shuttles and their prototype Enterprise.
  3. A Russian Soyuz capsule. (I can’t imagine two toddlers in this tiny capsule much less two grown men)!